Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #3: Roos

The ‘roos at the Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park are all wild and move freely throughout the park (with the exception of Hazel, who wears a collar). Please follow the safety instructions in the handouts you are given when you buy your ticket, as your actions may be interpreted as aggression/challenge and result in severe injury to you.

In short:
1. If a ‘roo moves away as you approach, leave it alone.
2. The safest place to touch a ‘roo is on the shoulders and back.
3. Don’t touch a ‘roo on the head, face or neck.
4. When a ‘roo scratches its stomach, don’t imitate it.
5. If a ‘roo hugs you, you may be in big trouble.
6. Don’t feed the ‘roos.

Tegan the Wallaroo -- I think

Tegan the Wallaroo — I think

Tegan likes to visit the gift shop at the Visitor Centre (door to the left).

Tegan the wallaroo (Macropus robustus)

Tegan the wallaroo (Macropus robustus)

wally-02

Possibly a Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)

Possibly a Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii)

I’ve probably got many of the species identifications wrong, so if you know better please leave a comment and I’ll make the necessary corrections.

Front paws, a.k.a. built-in weaponry

Front paws, a.k.a. built-in weaponry

 

Q: Why are these animals referred to as macropods? A: See this picture.

Q: Why are these animals referred to as macropods? A: See this picture.

 

Probably an Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus)

Probably an Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus)

That sleeping position doesn’t look very comfortable, but then I’m not a kangaroo.

Having a scratch.

Having a scratch.

roo-08

Wallabies squabbling towards the end of feeding time

Wallabies squabbling towards the end of feeding time

When a roo hugs you, it is probably getting ready to kick and/or disembowel.

Most of the ‘roo photos turned out unsuitable for publication because of lighting conditions — afternoon feeding time is not great for photography. Note to self: try the morning session next time.

Wallaby with young in pouch.

Wallaby with young in pouch.

Tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) or Rufous pademelon (Thylogale thetis)? I’m told that the Tammars have more grey in their fur so I’m leaning towards the former.

Wallaby with young in pouch.

Wallaby with young in pouch.

Update 30 July 2016: There is one wallaroo at AWWP and her name is Tegan. I have corrected the post to reflect this.

 
2015
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #1: Quoll and Devils
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #2: The Birds
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #3: Roos
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #4: Koalas and Echidna

2016
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park #1: Wombats and Dingoes
Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park 2016 #2: Roos

 

Date: 03 August 2015
Camera: Pentax K-5
Lens 1: Pentax smc DA 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 ED SDM
Ambient light only.
Conditions: Sunny with heavily shaded areas.
Hand-held only.
Cropping and resizing in Irfanview.

All images © Yet Another Tentacled Thing, 2015. All rights reserved.

Australia Walkabout Wildlife Park is permitted to use any image on this page for any purpose, provided that this permission is explicitly acknowledged wherever the image is published.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: