Two Nepenthes alata x khasiana clones

Side by side: Two very different Nepenthes alata x khasiana clones

Side by side: Two very different Nepenthes alata x khasiana clones

These plants were acquired as rooted cuttings in summer 2017.

The pitchers on both appear to be uppers; with any luck there’ll be basal shoots in year 2.

The first clone seems slower-growing than the second but has better colour: the side of the larger pitcher which faces the sun is a bright rosy pink.

The side most exposed to the sun is a very rosy pink

The side most exposed to the sun is a very rosy pink

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes alata x khasiana

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

The damage at the tip of the plant is caused by a caterpillar that ties silk around a developing leaf — preventing it from opening — and then lives and eats in this space. The plant recovers quickly once the infestation is dealt with.

An internet search reveals that Nepenthes ‘Nakaccho’ (alternatively spelled ‘Nakacho’) is N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana, bred by Issei & Nasuko Okuyama (Isseien Nursery, Hachijo, Japan), June 1985.

Nepenthes Nakaccho pitcher, pre-inflation

Nepenthes Nakaccho pitcher, pre-inflation

A developing Nepenthes Nakaccho pitcher

A developing Nepenthes Nakaccho pitcher

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

This pitcher, with its bulbous end full of fluid, tipped over and emptied itself when the plant was moved from its usual spot for the photo session. A dead stinkbug was its largest occupant.

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

When these uppers are very young they are almost entirely green except for a few narrow red bands unevenly distributed around the peristome. The definition becomes blurred as the pitchers age.

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

Nepenthes Nakaccho (N. alata (Hyotan) x N. khasiana)

Nepenthes khasiana is the only Nepenthes species found in India and grows at altitudes of 500m to 1500m. It is assessed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List (2015).

Nepenthes alata hails from the Philippines and grows at altitudes of 800m – 2400m.


Date: 18 June 2017
Camera: Pentax K-5
Lens 1: Sigma 50mm 1:2.8 DG Macro
Ambient light only.
Conditions: Overcast with clear spots, late afternoon.
Hand-held only.
Cropping and resizing in Irfanview.
All excursions are self-funded.

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2 Responses to Two Nepenthes alata x khasiana clones

  1. June Wong says:

    I have had 3 types of nepenthes for years now but sometime this year the plants with the giant cups and the round cups died on me. The remaining one is our local species I think with much smaller green cups. Even that has refused to give me cups with its tips behaving like tendrils instead.

    • There are several conditions to be met in order for your plant to thrive:

      1. Light.
      Bright filtered light is excellent — Nakaccho grows under a white horticultural grade shadecloth canopy rated at 50% UV coverage but receives some direct morning sunlight. The other lives in a shadehouse with the same grade of shadecloth. Plants in your environment will also thrive under a veranda as long as they get some direct morning or evening sunlight. Maybe an hour or so per day. Excessive sunlight will burn the leaves.

      2. Humidity.
      No issues with that at your location.

      3. Water and media.
      The potting media should be moist but not waterlogged. Many growers here use hanging pots along with frequent misting or watering, but that’s mainly because the humidity is lower here.

      Chopped coconut husk or coconut peat is excellent as long it is properly weathered and rinsed exceptionally well to get rid of salt and phenolic compounds. Cymbidium mix is good too. pH should be neutral or slightly acid.

      If your plant is not producing pitchers you’ll have to feed it. Try an orchid foliar fertilizer at a quarter of the recommended strength or less. Excessive feeding will kill the plant.

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